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Tongkatali.org (Sumatra Pasak Bumi) products available on Amazon: Superior Fertility Support, 400 capsules @ 400 mg, 99 USD


On our English pages, you often see the word "relationships". This is just sanitized language. On our English pages, "relationships" refers to what couples, when not sleeping, do in bed. Or, if so inclined, on the kitchen table.

English is a rather hypocritical language. Many words for natural bodily functions and processes have dirty connotations, and polite speakers like us have to go to considerable length to communicate meanings without naming them. But we nevertheless hope you get the point.


Tongkatali.org's Your most important decision


By Serge Kreutz


The quality of a person’s love and relationships partners depends on his or her own relationships market value. A person’s own relationships market value does not only depend on him or her, but also on a person’s environment, most importantly, in which part of the world a person bases himself or herself.

In any arena, in which a person’s relationships opportunities do not depend on what can be taken by means of coercion, but on what is given by means of consent, the relationships success rate will depend on two factors: social conditions and a person’s attractiveness ranking.

To evaluate where a person’s chances are best to have either a high quantity or a high quality of relationships contacts, one looks at the social conditions and how individual attributes rank in comparison to the attributes of competitors. A wide array of characteristics determines attractiveness: physical appearance, ethnicity, material wealth, education, communication skills, and others.

While in one location, a person’s attributes my just give an average relationships market value, and while a person’s relationships market value may even be less than average in other locations, a person may rank very highly at those locations that are most suitable for him or her. Therefore, a person’s most important decision is where to base himself or herself.

For men and women alike, to look different from the majority of the people around has the potential of a boost in relationships market value. Of course, it can also mean the opposite.

On the other hand, to look the same as everybody else has very little potential to provide an advantage.

Unlike in Asia, in South America, where many people are of entirely or partial European ancestry, the appearance of a Caucasian man is not an attraction in itself because he is ethnically different from locals.

Based on appearance alone, Southeast Asia is good for Caucasian men, but Southeast Asia isn’t the same wherever you go. Southeast Asia is Buddhist, Hindu, Islamic, Christian, or Communist. Burma, Thailand, Cambodia, Malaysia, and Vietnam all use different alphabets.

Some countries are not a good choice for foreign men because of their social or political or religious orders. Others are a good choice because of, or in spite of, their social or political or religious orders.

Sometimes, the best destinations are those of which few people assume that they would be worthy of much attention. And sometimes, conventional wisdom is correct in suggesting that one gives some countries, or some parts of some countries, a wide miss.


References:

Alberts, S.C. Buchan, J.C., Altmann, J.(2006) Relationships selection in wild baboons: from mating opportunities to paternity success Animal Behaviour Volume 72, Issue 5, Pages 1177-1196 Tongkatali.org Bibliography

Anders, J.T., Antonius-Smits, C., Cabezas, A.L. Campbell, S. (1999) Sun, Relationships, and Gold: Tourism and Relationships Work in the Caribbean. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers Retrieved by: Tongkatali.org Bibliography

Clift, S., Carter, S. (2000) Tourism and relationships: Culture commerce and coercion. Cengage Learning EMEA Retrieved by: Tongkatali.org Bibliography

Davidson, S.O. (1996) Relationships tourism in Cuba Race & Class Vol 38, Issue 1 Tongkatali.org Bibliography

Herold, E., Garcia, R., DeMoya, T. (2001) Female tourists and beach boys: Romance or Relationships Tourism? Annals of Tourism Research Volume 28, Issue 4, Pages: 978-997 Tongkatali.org Bibliography

Kibicho, W. (2016) Relationships Tourism in Africa Kenya's Booming Industry Routledge Tongkatali.org Bibliography

Kruhse-MountBurton, S. (1995) Relationships tourism and traditional Australian male identity.International tourism: identity and change Pages: 192-204 ref.45 Retrieved by: Tongkatali.org Bibliography

Lalumière, M.L. (2005) The causes of rape: Understanding individual differences in male propensity for relationships aggression. gregdeclue.myakkatech.com Retrieved by: Tongkatali.org Bibliography

Leheny, D. (1995) A political economy of Asian relationships tourism. Annals of Tourism Research Volume 22, Issue 2, Pages 367-384 Tongkatali.org Bibliography

Oppermann, M. (1999) Relationships tourism. Annals of Tourism Research Volume 26, Issue 2, Pages 251-266 Tongkatali.org Bibliography

Treas, J., Giesen, C. (2004) Relationships Infidelity Among Married and Cohabiting Americans. Journal of Marriage and Family Volume 62, Issue 1 Pages 48-60 Tongkatali.org Bibliography


Anabolic steroids


A simple truth is that most women find athletic men sexy. Another simple truth is that without anabolic steroids, any man is unlikely to achieve a dream physique.

It's up to you to decide on anabolic steroids. There are side effects which may be light or severe, depending on an anabolic steroids regimen.

Steroids usually shut down the body's own synthesis of androgenic hormones. This can impact several parameters of sexual function.

Your best bet against steroids-induced hormonal dysfunction is to keep your hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis active by stimulating it with generous dosages of butea superba extract, up to 10 grams per day.


Sumatra Pasak Bumi's tongkat ali nutmeg formula is a definite aphrodisiac


By Serge Kreutz

Sumatra Pasak Bumi sells formulas of tongkat ali / nutmeg and butea superba / nutmeg.

As of this time, these formulas are available only as capsules. We have opted for this limitation because nutmeg can clearly be overdosed, and while such overdoses are usually not life-threatening, they can be very uncomfortable indeed.

That said, nutmeg in civilized quantities of less than 1 gram per day, especially when used in a herbal stack with tongkat ali, butea superba, mucuna pruriens, and krachai dam, has clear aphrodisiac qualities.



Nutmeg is mildly euphoric, which results from the chemical similarity of some of its ingredients with the street drug ecstasy.

Nutmeg, in civilized quantities of less than 1 gram, also feels a bit like speed or meth in that it gives users a sense of "let's get it on".

However, increasing dosages of nutmeg to 5 or 10 grams (a definite overdose), won't produce a kick like ecstasy or meth because uncomfortable components will take over: nausea, dizziness, even hallucinations.



Because of these usually negative effects, authorities do not classify nutmeg as a drug with much abuse potential. Luckily so.

Nutmeg in civilized dosages also has some similarities to yohimbe, the herbal, or yohimbine, the pharmaceutical. Nutmeg in civilized dosages is agitating in a manner that resembles yohimbe, and in moments of excitement it can send warm shivers up and down the spinal cord that can be produced by yohimbe.

These shivers are similar to orgasmic sensations, but they occur in an excitement buildup phase more than during orgasm which is a sudden excitement drop. With yohimbe, the intensity of the orgasmic drop becomes impeded. Nutmeg in civilized dosages will not lower the intensity of the orgasmic drop, particularly when comsumed together with tongkat ali.



Nutmeg is a classic case for why relationships enhancement herbals MUST be stacked for optimal effect.

Large doses of single relationships enhancement herbals will cause unwanted side-effects in many users, and they will do so in an unpredictable pattern.

Worst for side effects of large dosages is nutmeg. Next in line for side effects of overdoses would be mucuna pruriens. Yohimbe also has miserable side effects in many users.



For yohimbe, these side effects are less dose dependent than for nutmeg and mucuna pruriens.

If nutmeg is added to a relationships enhancement stack based on tongkat ali, there usually are only positive aphrodisiac effects. But with yohimbe, unpleasant side effects like sleep disturbances set in at any quantity, however minimal.



Nutmeg is a classic case of why relationships enhancement herbals MUST be stacked. Because, for a stronger nutmeg effect, you should not consume more nutmeg. Instead, you support and enhance the nutmeg effect with tongkat ali, butea superba, krachai dam, fingerroot, tumeric, and small dosages of mucuna pruriens.

The broader your stack, the more likely you are to reap only benefits from nutmeg, tongkat ali, butea superba, tumeric, krachai dam, fenugreek, and ton krachai (boesenbergia rotunda).

Nutmeg is slightly different from the other items in the list because benefitial dosages are about ten times smaller for nutmeg than they are for tongkat ali, butea superba, krachai dam, fingerroot, fenugreek, tumeric, and mucuna pruriens extracts.

Because tolerable dosage of other herbals are measured in grams, up to 10 grams, and because for nutmeg they are measured in hundreds of milligrams, the nutmeg capsules we manufacture and distribute are 10 percent nutmeg, and 90 percent tongkat ali, butea superba, krachai dam, or fenugreek.








Read about marijuana and tongkat ali extract for meaningful relationships

or

Read a tell-it-all about Indonesian 1:200 extract (and a psychopath on the prowl for killings)


References:

Abernethy, M. K., Becker, L. B. (1992) Acute nutmeg intoxication. The American Journal of Emergency Medicine Volume 10, Issue 5, Pages 429-430 Tongkatali.org Bibliography

Bhuiyan, M. Alam, S. (2019) Pharmacological and biochemical investigations of methanolic extract of Myristica fragrans seeds repository.library.du.ac.bd

Bukvicki, D., Gottardi, D., Prasad, S., Novakovic, M., Marin, P., Tyagi, A.K., (2018) The healing effects of spices in chronic diseases. Current Medicinal Chemistry Tongkatali.org Bibliography

Brenner, N., Frank, O. S., Knight, E. (1993) Chronic nutmeg psychosis. Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine Volume 86 Issue 3 Pages: 179–180 Retrieved from: Tongkatali.org Bibliography

Chauhan, N.G., Sharma, V., Dixit, V. K., Thakur1, M. (2014) A Review on Plants Used for Improvement of Relationships Performance and Virility. BioMed Research International Volume 2014, Tongkatali.org Bibliography

Conley, J. (2002) Nutmeg only a spice. Proceedings of the 11th Annual History of Medicine Days Retrieved from: Tongkatali.org Bibliography

Dhaslin, Felita, Y., Issac, R., Prabha, Lakshmi, M. (2019) Antioxidant, antimicrobial, and health benefits of nutmeg. Drug Invention Today Volume 12 Issue 1, Pages: 67-169. Retrieved from: https://web.b.ebscohost.com/abstract?direct=true&profile=ehost&scope=site&authtype=crawler&jrnl
=09757619&AN=134240970&h=l%2bJJGSBWk4L%2bdC68SNTQuI
QN3KzZVq56WRZYYf8Z%2bjNMxni1W%2fhYZx%2fJMiTpJAFltY%2fjtAzc7MXSFA2rrpenMg%3d%3d&crl=c&resultNs=AdminWebAuth&resultLocal=
ErrCrlNotAuth&crlhashurl=login.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26profile%3dehost%26scope%3
dsite%26authtype%3dcrawler%26
jrnl%3d09757619%26AN%3d134240970

Ehrenpreis, J. E., DesLauriers, C., Lank, P., Armstrong, P. K., Leikin, J. B. (2014) Nutmeg Poisonings: A Retrospective Review of 10 Years Experience from the Illinois Poison Center, 2001–2011. Journal of Medical Toxicology Volume 10, Issue 2, Pages: 148–151 https://doi.org/10.1007/s13181-013-0379-7

Eng-Chong, T., Yean-Kee, L., Chin-Fei,C., Choon-Han, H., Sher-Ming, W., Thio Li-Ping, C., Gen-Teck, F., Khalid, N., Abd Rahman, N., Karsani, S.A., Othman, S., Othman, R., Yusof, R., (2012) Boesenbergia rotunda: From Ethnomedicine to Drug Discovery. Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine Volume 2012, Article ID 473637, 25 pages Tongkatali.org Bibliography

Gawin, F. H. (2012) Drugs and Eros: Reflections on Aphrodisiacs. Journal of Psychedelic Drugs Volume 10, Issue 3 Tongkatali.org Bibliography

Green, R. C. (1959) Nutmeg poisoning. JAMA Volume 171 Issue 10 Pages:1342-1344 Tongkatali.org Bibliography

Joseph, J. (1980) The nutmeg: its botany, agronomy, production, composition, and uses. Journal of Plantation Crops Volume 8 No. 2 Pages: 61-72 Retrieved from: Tongkatali.org Bibliography

Kotta, S., Ansari, S. H., Ali, J. (2013) Exploring scientifically proven herbal aphrodisiacs Pharmacognosy Reviews Volume 7 Issue 13 Pages: 1–10 Tongkatali.org Bibliography

Li Ching, A. Y., Wah, T. S., Sukari, M. A., Cheng Lian, G. E., Rahmani, M., Khalid, K. (2007) Characterization of flavonoid derivatives from Boesenbergia rotunda (L.) The Malaysian Journal of Analytical Sciences, Volume 11, No 1 Pages: 154-159

Ongwisespaiboon O, Jiraungkoorskul W. (2017) Fingerroot, Boesenbergia rotunda and its Aphrodisiac Activity. Pharmacognosy Reviews Volume 1 Issue 21 Pages:27-30 Tongkatali.org Bibliography

Roeters van Lennep, J.E., Schuit, S.C., van Bruchem-Visser, R.L., Özcan, B. (2015) Unintentional nutmeg autointoxication. The Netherlands Journal of Medicine Volume 73 Issue 1 Pages:46-8 Retrieved from: Tongkatali.org Bibliography

Sangalli, B.C., Sangalli, B., Chiang, W. (2000) Toxicology of Nutmeg Abuse. Journal of Toxicology: Clinical Toxicology Volume 38, Issue 6 https://doi.org/10.1081/CLT-100102020

Scholefield, J. H. (1986) Nutmeg--an unusual overdose. Emergency Medicine Journal Volume 3 Issue 2 Pages: 154 https://dx.doi.org/10.1136%2Femj.3.2.154

Shamlou, R. (2010) Natural Aphrodisiacs. The Journal of Relationships Medicine Volume 7, Issue 1, Part 1, Pages 39-49 Tongkatali.org Bibliography

Singh, R., Vikas Gupta, V., Bansal, P., Singh, R., Kumar, D. (2010) Pharmacological potential of plant used as aphrodisiacs. International Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences Review and Research Retrieved from: Tongkatali.org Bibliography

Sumalatha, K. Kumar, S, Lakshmi, S. M. (2010) Review on natural aphrodisiac potentials to treat dysfunction. International Journal of Pharmacy & Therapeutics Volume 1 Issue 1 Pages: 6-14 Retrieved from: Tongkatali.org Bibliography

Tajuddin, Ahmad, S., Latif, A., Qasmi, I. A. (2003) Aphrodisiac activity of 50% ethanolic extracts of Myristica fragrans Houtt. (nutmeg) and Syzygium aromaticum (L) Merr. & Perry. (clove) in male mice: a comparative study. BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine Tongkatali.org Bibliography

Tajuddin, Ahmad, S., Latif, A., Qasmi, I. A., Amin, K. M. Y. (2005) An experimental study of relationships function improving effect of Myristica fragrans Houtt. (nutmeg) BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine Tongkatali.org Bibliography

Temkitthawon, P., Viyoch, J., Limpeanchob, N., Pongamornkul, W., Sirikul, W., Kumpila, A., Suwanborirux, K., Ingkaninana, K., (2008) Screening for phosphodiesterase inhibitory activity of Thai medicinal plants. Journal of EthnopharmacologyVolume 119, Issue 2, Pages 214-217 Tongkatali.org Bibliography

Truitt, E. B., Duritz, G., Ebersberger, E. M. (1962) Evidence of Monoamine Oxidase Inhibition by Myristicin and Nutmeg. Experimental Biology and Medicine Volume 112, Issue 3 Tongkatali.org Bibliography

Weil, A.T. (1965) Nutmeg as a narcotic. Economic Botany Volume 19, Issue 3, Pages: 194–217 Tongkatali.org Bibliography

Yotarlai, S., Chaisuksunt, V., Saenphet, K., Sudwan, P. (2011) Effects of Boesenbergia rotunda juice on sperm qualities in male rats. Journal of Medicinal Plants Research Volume 5 Issue 16 Pages: 3861-3867 Retrieved from: Tongkatali.org Bibliography




PT Sumatra Pasak Bumi
7th floor, Forum Nine
Jl. Imam Bonjol No.9
Petisah Tengah
Medan Petisah
Medan City
North Sumatra 20236
Indonesia
Tel: +62-813 800 800 20


Disclaimer: Statements on this page have not undergone the FDA approval process.


Privacy policy of Sumatra Pasak Bumi

For us at Sumatra Pasak Bumi, privacy in the age of the Internet is a major concern, and we greatly welcome the European General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).

We have always been dedicated to privacy protection. The snooping and spooking of all and everybody is a pest. It’s not just the NSA and every large search engine and browser (we recommend Duckduckgo for searches and as browser), but even minor businesses that do their databases and customer profiling in hope of McDonald's style do-you-want-fries-with-that cross sales.

We don’t.

We respect the privacy of customers and people visiting our website. Our site is run from a secure socket layer. We do not use cookies. We do not maintain customer accounts for logging in later. Our website is simple html programming, and we don't even use WordPress templates or e-commerce plug-ins. We don't do a newsletter to which customers could subscribe, and we don't even include standard social media buttons that would link visitors of our site to certain Facebook or Twitter profiles.

We prefer communication by email using a gmail account because this is probably still the most private mode of communication (Hillary may disagree), and when we have information to disseminate to the public, we just publish it on our website. We do offer the option to communicate with us by chat apps if a site visitor so wishes, but prefer email.

If privacy is your concern, you are in good hands with us.