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On our English pages, you often see the word "relationships". This is just sanitized language. On our English pages, "relationships" refers to what couples, when not sleeping, do in bed. Or, if so inclined, on the kitchen table.

English is a rather hypocritical language. Many words for natural bodily functions and processes have dirty connotations, and polite speakers like us have to go to considerable length to communicate meanings without naming them. But we nevertheless hope you get the point.


Tongkatali.org's Keeping Third World countries poor


By Serge Kreutz


Luckily, local elites in many Third World countries are not very interested in the common good, and more interested in their own benefits.

Luckily, too, rich people in Western countries are usually not interested in creating wealth, by means of foreign investment, in Third World countries.

Most foreign investment in Third World countries is temporary and just geared towards profit-taking. It is not a form of long-term asset creation or even just long-term asset management. As practically all profits are repatriated (to be consumed somewhere else), such foreign investment does not create wealth in Third World countries. And the little wealth that initially seems to be created in the Third World country anyway will be moved to developed countries when rich locals emigrate.

All foreign investment that finances the exploitation of natural resources in Third World countries is likely to be a net drain of a Third World country’s wealth. Capital that is brought into a Third World country to exploit natural resources for export is not wealth. This capital just finances tools which, after a short while, are only of scrap value.

The only certain case of a transfer of wealth from one country to another country is the transfer of wealthy people. And that trend does not point in the direction of Third World countries, but the opposite way.

Wealthy locals in many Third World countries typically are busy transferring their own wealth to developed nations.

The super rich from the Third World bring the money they made from the West back to the West
http://money.guardian.co.uk/tax/story/0,,1755287,00.html

The rich getting even richer in the Third World
http://business.guardian.co.uk/story/0,,1802373,00.html

Most children of really rich people in most Third World countries go to private schools in the UK, Australia, New Zealand, the US, or Switzerland.

International students boost Scottish economy by £312m
http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-scotland-32919517

Selling education to overseas students has become a major industry in New Zealand
http://archived.ccc.govt.nz/cityscene/2003/November/ALessonForEducationSector.asp

Often enough, these children of Third World elites sooner or later become permanent residents, or citizens, in those rich countries. Any citizen of a Third World country who has amassed a fortune in the range of 0.5 to 2 million US dollars has an easy time applying for a residence permit in most developed nations.

Invest 1 million pounds in the UK, and become a UK permanent resident http://www.workpermit.com/uk/investor.htm

Invest 500,000 dollars in the US, and get a Green Card
http://www.uscis.gov/green-card/green-card-through-job/green-card-through-investment

People with a net worth of 800,000 Canadian dollars can easily immigate to Canada
http://candoimmigration.ca/coming-to-canada/business-immigration-and-investors/

Migrating to Australia, based on a net value of 500,000 Australian dollars
http://www.skillclear.co.uk/australia/australian-business-visa.asp

That rich locals transfer wealth back to the US and Europe prolongs much of African, and Third World, poverty. And this won’t change by allowing Third World countries better access to the markets in the developed countries. While such easier access may cause a larger number of traders in Third World countries to become rich, these traders will anyway bring their wealth back to the developed countries once they emigrate to one of them.

Thus the much touted policies of better market access for products of Third World countries will, at the end, create wealth in developed countries (the emigration destinations of rich locals from Third World countries), and not for the Third World countries themselves.

Traditionally, Third World countries could offer to their local elites that these elites were, to a certain degree, independent from the law. In many Third World countries, rich people could pretty much do what they wanted. That’s a real piece of quality of life. And it’s waiting to be sold to rich people from North America and Western Europe.

International NGOs claim that curtailing the privileges of local elites (eradicating corruption) will help the economic development of a country, thus creating wealth.

It won’t. It will only make the local elites leave, and take their wealth to Europe or America.


References:

Atkinson, A.B. (2019) Measuring Poverty Around the World Princeton University Press Tongkatali.org Bibliography

Beckford, G.L. (1999) Persistent poverty: underdevelopment in plantation economies of the Third World. University of the West Indies Press Retrieved by: Tongkatali.org Bibliography

Berg-Schlosser, D., Kersting, N. (2003) Poverty and democracy: self-help and political participation in Third World cities. Zed Books Retrieved by: Tongkatali.org Bibliography

Bromley, R., Gerry, C. (1979) Casual work and poverty in third world cities. Center for Development Studies Retrieved by: Tongkatali.org Bibliography

Buvinic, M; Yudelman, S.W. (1989) Women, poverty and progress in the Third World. New York, Foreign Policy Association Retrieved by: Tongkatali.org Bibliography

Dent, M., Peters, B. (2019) The Crisis of Poverty and Debt in the Third World Routledge Tongkatali.org Bibliography

Hardoy, J. E, Satterthwaite, D., (1984) Third world cities and the environment of poverty. Geoforum Volume 15, Issue 3, Pages: 307-333 Tongkatali.org Bibliography

Harrison, P. (1981) Inside the Third World: the anatomy of poverty. London, England, Penguin BooksRetrieved by: Tongkatali.org Bibliography

Hunter, S. (2019) OPEC and the Third World: The Politics of Aid Routledge Tongkatali.org Bibliography

Weisband, E. (2019) Poverty Amidst Plenty: World Political Economy And Distributive Justice Routledge Tongkatali.org Bibliography

Yapa, L. (2002) How the discipline of geography exacerbates poverty in the Third World. <1>Futures Volume 34, Issue 1, Pages: 33-46 Tongkatali.org Bibliography


Buying tongkat ali


By Serge Kreutz


So you have decided to try some tongkat ali. But before buying, some important decisions are to be made.

Do you want tongkat ali roots, or do you want tongkat ali extract?

If you buy roots, the cost of shipping will be much higher than the roots themselves.

Brewing your own tea will also be time-consuming.

If you want extract, you first have to decide whether you want genuine tongkat ali or fake tongkat ali?

Unfortunately, more than 90 percent of all tongkat ali extract on the market is simply fake.

There are two kinds of fakes:

1. those that are any root powder or plant, mostly tribulus terrestris. These simply have no effect at all.

2. powders laced with sildenafil analogues, often at high dosages. These have an effect, just like Viagra has. But it's not the hormonal effect of tongkat ali. It's an effect of sildenafil, tadalafil, or vardenafil. And unfortunately, these fakes regularly kill users.

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Tongkat ali is a root, and as such, it consists mostly of cellulose. Cellulose is not a pharmacologically active substance. The pharmacologically active ingredients only form a very small part of the root.

The raw root, whether powdered or chipped, is not fit for human consumption. This is not just the case because humans cannot digest cellulose but also because the raw root often is infested with fungi and bacteria, some of which are harmful. This is absolutely normal for anything that grows underground. Is there anything humans would pull out of the soil and consume uncooked?

Raw root powder is commonly sold in Malaysia as well as in the US, both in brick-and-mortar shops and by Internet retailers.

There is, of course, nothing wrong with root powder or chipped root, as long as you know how to handle it.

If you do not buy a ready-made extract, you have to prepare the root powder or chipped root as your own extract. This can be a liquid extract or a dry one. If you prepare a liquid extract, you will have to consume a lot of fluid to get a proper dosage. Producing your own dry extract will take a lot of time.

Root powder in capsules is nonsense because one should not ingest raw tongkat ali root, even not if it is packaged in gelatin capsules. The most likely effect of ingesting raw root powder is diarrhea, caused by salmonella bacteria. And if you are unlucky, you get a strain that causes typhoid fever.

Tongkat ali is so bitter, and tastes so lousy, that the only way one can ingest a proper dosage is to get it down as quickly as possible. Capsules of dried tongkat ali extract are a good solution because extract is concentrated, and you can swallow the tongkat ali without tasting it.

The only problem with dried extract in capsules is that you are easily cheated. It is very difficult to check yourself whether you actually get tongkat ali extract, or just tongkat ali root powder, or something else altogether.

Tongkat ali root has to be boiled, and before being boiled. Use about half a liter of water for 50 gram of root powder or chipped root. 50 gram of root powder or chipped root will yield about 2 normal dosages, or a single dosage for an experienced user or a bodybuilding athlete.

I know what I’m talking about because I did make my own extract. I did so because I am a suspicious character, and so that I could write about it.

I used 500 gram of chipped root, soaked in 5 liter of water for 24 hours. I brought the whole thing to a boil, and then filtered the water. I then left the 5 liters of water for almost 2 days on an electric stove with heat control (about 50 centigrade) until I got a thick sap. I further heated the sap in an electric oven (about 40 centigrade) and then got a rather hard crust. Working this crust through an electric coffee mill, I ended up with about 10 gram of powdered extract. Which means: an extract of the strength 1:50. 10 dosages out of 500 gram.

I discussed this extraction process with two German pharmacists and the assistants of a plant analytical laboratory of a university. They all assured me that mine has been a proper extraction process.

There isn’t much technology to preparing water-based extracts. The solvent has to be water, and just water, otherwise the result would not be an aqueous (water) extract. In proper extracting facilities, they have integrated machines that speed up the evaporation by doing it under high pressure, or by other means. Some companies that sell such evaporating equipment have patents on these machines.

But if a website claims that they have patented the extraction by water of tongkat ali, then that’s bulls. They just want you to believe that their extract is special (so that you won’t buy somewhere else), and that it justifies an inflated price.

Tongkat ali has been researched well, though not in full. But one thing is certain: the traditional use is as an aqueous extract (extraction by water, as in tea or coffee), and that way, it has been used in Southeast Asia for hundreds of years.

Other extraction possibilities would be by ethanol (alcohol) or chloroform, and a plethora of other chemical solvents. But such extracts have only been tested recently, and only one thing is clear: their LD50 values are much worse than those for aqueous extract. I would not experiment with tongkat ali extracts in which the solvent has been anything but water.

Extract strength is another critical topic. I know from my own experiments that 100 grams of root yield a dried extract of 2 gram. So, 1:50 seems to be genuine strength of an aqueous extract.

Of course, 1:100 sounds much sexier. But who is to check on such claims? Even if a new trader should decide to proclaim that his extract is 1:1000, who is going to examine whether the claim is true?

A 1:100 extract, or one that is proclaimed to be 1:1000, doesn’t necessarily contain more active ingredients. In order to turn a 1:50 extract into one that is 1:100, I really just have to discard half of the 1:50 extract. I can do so by passing it through a smaller mesh, which will just remove the coarser part of the ground crust I got from drying the aqueous extract.

Thus, turning a 1:50 extract into a 1:100 extract means just that they sell half the extract, probably for double the price. It says NOTHING about the efficacy of the extract.

Furthermore, there are justified suspicions that what is sold as 1:100 extract may only be root powder. I have seen documents on the FDA website (www.fda.gov) that show that people marketing 1:100 extract capsules have just applied for a registration of tongkat ali powder in capsule form, not of extract in capsules. To see these documents on www.fda.gov, please use their search engine and enter the search term “eurycoma”. The scientific, Latin name of tongkat ali is eurycoma longifolia, and official documents deal with the plant under this name. Do not search for “tongkat ali”, as this will not get you to the FDA correspondence about the product which is sold as 1:100. A search for the combined name, “eurycoma longifolia”, doesn’t seem to work well on the FDA site. It is best to just search for “eurycoma” only.

I also cannot recommend purchasing from Internet spam sites.

Their expertise is not tongkat ali but Internet marketing. They know how to force their own site(s) to the top of search engine rankings, and then hunt sales commissions from the manufacturers whose products they promote. This is why the information they provide is not their own but just taken from other sites (like mine) and then more or less reworded.

I believe that it makes sense to buy tongkat ali or tongkat ali extract at the origin. From a company whose product is tongkat ali, and not from a company whose product is Internet marketing, and who will sell any merchandise for which they can get a high search engine ranking.


References:

Balasubramanian A, Thirumavalavan N, Srivatsav A, Yu J, Lipshultz L, Pastuszak AW. (2019) Testosterone importance an analysis of populat online testosterone boosting supplements. The Journal of Relationships Medicine Vol 16 No 2 Pages:203-212

Bujang, B., Chee, C.F., Heh, C.H., Rahman, N. A. (2017) Phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors and their analogues as adulterants of herbal and food products: analysis of the Malaysian market in 2014-2016. Food Additives & Contaminants: Part A: Chemistry, Analysis, Control, Exposure & Risk Assessment, Volume 34 Issue 7 http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19440049.2017.1336674

Favila, A., Shivam, P. (2019) Systems and methods for online fraud detection. United States Patent 10178093 Retrieved from: Tongkatali.org Bibliography

FMT Reporters (2017) Another Tongkat Ali coffee product recalled in the US. Free Malaysia Today Retrieved from: https://www.freemalaysiatoday.com/category/nation/2017/07/21/another-tongkat-ali-coffee-product-recalled-in-the-us/

FMT Reporters (2017) Coffee product with Tongkat Ali recalled in the US. Retrieved from: https://www.freemalaysiatoday.com/category/nation/2017/05/28/coffee-product-with-tongkat-ali-recalled-in-the-us/

Herrman, J., (2018) Want to Understand What Ails the Modern Internet? Look at eBay. The New York Times Magazine

Lin YT, Huang YC, Lee HC, Liao CH, Lin YL, Tsai CF, Cheng HF., (2017) Isolation and identification of a novel sildenafil analogue adulterant in herbal products. Food Additives & Contaminants: Part A: Chemistry, Analysis, Control, Exposure & Risk Assessment Volume 34 Issue 3 Pages:330-334. https://doi.org/10.1080/19440049.2016.1272137

Mojzych M, Karczmarzyk Z, Wysocki W, Ceruso M, Supuran CT, Kryštof V, Urbanczyk-Lipkowska Z, Kalicki P. (2015) New approaches to the synthesis of sildenafil analogues and their enzyme inhibitory activity. Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry Volume 23 Issue 7 Pages:1421-1429 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bmc.2015.02.026

Mokhtar SU, Chin ST, Kee CL, Low MY, Drummer OH, Marriott PJ. (2016). Rapid determination of sildenafil and its analogues in dietary supplements using gas chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry. Journal of Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Analysis https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpba.2016.01.034

Pharmaceutical Society of Zambia Warns Public against Taking Natural Power SX High Energy Drink (2019) Lusaka Times Retrieved from: https://www.lusakatimes.com/2019/01/05/pharmaceutical-society-of-zambia-warns-public-against-taking-natural-power-sx-high-energy-drink/

Retzler, K., (2019) Erectile dysfunction A review of comprehensive treatment options for optimal outcome. Journal Restorative Medicine Vol 8 No 1

Sario, R., (2014) 40000 sachets of fake tongkat ali premixed coffee. The Star Online. Retrieved from: https://www.thestar.com.my/news/nation/2014/08/15/fake-coffee-seized-from-mln-operation-in-sabah/

Sorell, T., Whitty, M.T., Online romance scams and victimhood Security Journal

Tao, L., Lei, Y., JianShan, W., BingJie, L., (2017) Screening and identification of sildenafil analogues illegally added in healthy foods by ultra performance liquid chromatography-triple quadrupole linear/ion trap of mass spectrometry. Journal of Food Safety and Quality, Vol.8 No.10 pp.3991-3996 ref.15 Retrieved from: https://www.cabdirect.org/cabdirect/abstract/20183006490

Whitty, Monica T. (2019) Predicting susceptibility to cyber-fraud victimhood. Journal of Financial Crime



Tongkat Ali (Eurycoma longifolia Jack): A review on its ethnobotany and pharmacological importance

Bhat, R., Karim, A. A. (2010)

Eurycoma longifolia Jack is an herbal medicinal plant of South-East Asian origin, popularly recognized as ‘Tongkat Ali.’ The plant parts have been traditionally used for its antimalarial, aphrodisiac, anti-diabetic, antimicrobial and anti-pyretic activities, which have also been proved scientifically. The plant parts are rich in various bioactive compounds (like eurycomaoside, eurycolactone, eurycomalactone, eurycomanone, and pasakbumin-B) among which the alkaloids and quassinoids form a major portion. Even though toxicity and safety evaluation studies have been pursued, still a major gap exists in providing scientific base for commercial utilization and clearance of the Tongkat Ali products with regard to consumer's safety. The present review aims at reviewing the research works undertaken till date, on this plant in order to provide sufficient baseline information for future works and for commercial exploitation.




PT Sumatra Pasak Bumi
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Petisah Tengah
Medan Petisah
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Privacy policy of Sumatra Pasak Bumi

For us at Sumatra Pasak Bumi, privacy in the age of the Internet is a major concern, and we greatly welcome the European General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).

We have always been dedicated to privacy protection. The snooping and spooking of all and everybody is a pest. It’s not just the NSA and every large search engine and browser (we recommend Duckduckgo for searches and as browser), but even minor businesses that do their databases and customer profiling in hope of McDonald's style do-you-want-fries-with-that cross sales.

We don’t.

We respect the privacy of customers and people visiting our website. Our site is run from a secure socket layer. We do not use cookies. We do not maintain customer accounts for logging in later. Our website is simple html programming, and we don't even use WordPress templates or e-commerce plug-ins. We don't do a newsletter to which customers could subscribe, and we don't even include standard social media buttons that would link visitors of our site to certain Facebook or Twitter profiles.

We prefer communication by email using a gmail account because this is probably still the most private mode of communication (Hillary may disagree), and when we have information to disseminate to the public, we just publish it on our website. We do offer the option to communicate with us by chat apps if a site visitor so wishes, but prefer email.

If privacy is your concern, you are in good hands with us.