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On our English pages, you often see the word "relationships". This is just sanitized language. On our English pages, "relationships" refers to what couples, when not sleeping, do in bed. Or, if so inclined, on the kitchen table.

English is a rather hypocritical language. Many words for natural bodily functions and processes have dirty connotations, and polite speakers like us have to go to considerable length to communicate meanings without naming them. But we nevertheless hope you get the point.


Tongkatali.org's Choosing the right country


By Serge Kreutz


I am an expert when it comes to finding optimal relationships opportunities. But I'm not perfect. And it is a dangerous position to believe that one knows "everything" that there is to know on relationships destinations. That can easily result in learned incompetence.

For this reason, I periodically review the conclusions I have made a few years earlier. I have, for example, been to Indonesia twice in the 80s and early 90s, and each time discarded it as unsuitable, until, at the third trial, I discovered the country's enormous potential.

I do the rounds every few years to countries I have previously dismissed, just to make sure that my earlier decision was appropriate. We live one life only, and it is too valuable to not be at the best place. After all, where to be is our most important decision.

The decision-making process on where to be starts with choosing the best country. Countries change. The Philippines was ideal in the early 80's, and it was probably even better in the 70's. There was a decisive turn to the worse in the late 80' (but then, for relationships adventures, most of the region did lose some of its attractiveness, and so did other parts of the world).

My experience is that once countries get worse for relationships adventures of foreigners, they don't get better for many years (probably not within a normal lifetime). For this reason, I do not want to be a latecomer among foreigners who visit a country for relationships adventures.

I was in Thailand at the beginning of the 80's when Thailand was a pure relationships tourism destination. But at that time, Thailand was already on the decline as a destination for relationships adventures. I was in Cambodia in the mid 90's when the only way to get safely to Phnom Penh was to fly in.

When I revisited Thailand in the early 90's and Cambodia in 2001, I could clearly see how things got worse. I have little interest in a country that was much better a few years earlier (when even back then, I decided against it, and in favor of another country).

Of course, once a country qualifies as a relationships destination, its quality as such will decline, and it will do so the faster, the more Westerners go there for relationships adventures.

So, is the World as such getting worse for the playboy lifestyle? Probably, in the first decade of the 21st century, this is the case. In the late 60's and the 70's, the world overall got better.

But even if the World gets worse overall, there are always some countries that, unexpectedly, get better. A good example is China. That country was totally unsuited up to the late 80s, but in the late 90s, China became good destination. But as all countries, after becoming a good destination for relationships adventures rather suddenly, there will likely be a rather long decline when matters gradually become worse and worse.

The challenge is to always find the country that at a certain time either has become a good destination, or that simply, at a certain time, is the best hunting ground. It's a terrible waste of one's life to be at the wrong place.


References:

Alberts, S.C. Buchan, J.C., Altmann, J.(2006) Relationships selection in wild baboons: from mating opportunities to paternity success Animal Behaviour Volume 72, Issue 5, Pages 1177-1196 Tongkatali.org Bibliography

Anders, J.T., Antonius-Smits, C., Cabezas, A.L. Campbell, S. (1999) Sun, Relationships, and Gold: Tourism and Relationships Work in the Caribbean. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers Retrieved by: Tongkatali.org Bibliography

Clift, S., Carter, S. (2000) Tourism and relationships: Culture commerce and coercion. Cengage Learning EMEA Retrieved by: Tongkatali.org Bibliography

Davidson, S.O. (1996) Relationships tourism in Cuba Race & Class Vol 38, Issue 1 Tongkatali.org Bibliography

Herold, E., Garcia, R., DeMoya, T. (2001) Female tourists and beach boys: Romance or Relationships Tourism? Annals of Tourism Research Volume 28, Issue 4, Pages: 978-997 Tongkatali.org Bibliography

Kibicho, W. (2016) Relationships Tourism in Africa Kenya's Booming Industry Routledge Tongkatali.org Bibliography

Kruhse-MountBurton, S. (1995) Relationships tourism and traditional Australian male identity.International tourism: identity and change Pages: 192-204 ref.45 Retrieved by: Tongkatali.org Bibliography

Lalumière, M.L. (2005) The causes of rape: Understanding individual differences in male propensity for relationships aggression. gregdeclue.myakkatech.com Retrieved by: Tongkatali.org Bibliography

Leheny, D. (1995) A political economy of Asian relationships tourism. Annals of Tourism Research Volume 22, Issue 2, Pages 367-384 Tongkatali.org Bibliography

Oppermann, M. (1999) Relationships tourism. Annals of Tourism Research Volume 26, Issue 2, Pages 251-266 Tongkatali.org Bibliography

Treas, J., Giesen, C. (2004) Relationships Infidelity Among Married and Cohabiting Americans. Journal of Marriage and Family Volume 62, Issue 1 Pages 48-60 Tongkatali.org Bibliography



Tongkatali.org - Emotions are just biochemistry


By Serge Kreutz


That goes for orgasms and libido, just as it goes for happiness and sadness, love and pain, and all stages of awareness. It’s all very chemical, with hormones and neurotransmitters the main players. Sensual input and emotional output are an overlay, through which neurobiochemistry communicates with the outside world.

It’s in our genetic constellation that certain biochemical states appear pleasant and others don’t. There is a wide range of variation, as some people even consider certain manifestations of pain, including suffocation, as erotic, and others have a very limited capacity for love.

There are, in principle, two methods by which we can interfere with our brain chemistry.

Either pharmacologically, via the supply of chemicals, or non-pharmacologically.

Good non-pharmacological methods are many forms of sexual activity, other pleasurable endeavors, from food to music, thrills like skiing or rock climbing, physical exhaustion by running or biking, or hypnosis and meditation. The purpose of all the above is the endogenous release of neurochemicals that make us feel good.

On the other side of the strata are chemicals that directly induce positive feelings, of which opiates are the best example. On the right opiates, one feels good whatever one’s actual condition. Philosophically, opiates are one of the greatest achievements of mankind, as they allow us to engineer a gentle death.

And then, there is a wide range of possible pharmaceutical interferences with our existence that do not make us feel good directly but enhance our natural potential to feel good. Sildenafil citrate, tongkat ali, marijuana, yohimbe, and dopaminergics, even though they are very different one from the other, all are used because they enhance our potential to feel good on the sexual route. Testosterone and tongkat ali have effects on the male physique, and can make users feel better when looking into a mirror.

That governments regulate some of these substances has nothing to do with how useful they are for the individual. It’s also not that governments prohibit substances out of concern for the health of their citizens. If that were the case, alcohol would have been banned long ago. Substances are banned for a complex constellation of ideas on the part of those who have the power to decide, and many of the ideas are simply false.

The bottom line is: that some substances make us feel good by intervention with brain chemistry speaks in their favor, not against them.



I can help you to improve your relationships life and your physique with tongkat ali and butea superba


By Serge Kreutz



Whole roots need to be chipped and the boiled for 15 minutes. The resulting tea tastes absolutely terrible, to say the least. However, not everyone who wants to use tongkat ali is willing to go through the process of preparing his or her own tea. Quite a number of people prefer a ready-made, ready to use product.

We at tongkatali.org sell a selection of well-established testosterone boosters.

I myself started with the testosterone booster tongkat ali when I was into bodybuilding. Nothing dramatic, not good enough for competition or even just to post photos.

The following is the text, slightly modified, that got me going on using tongkat ali for bodybuilding, and ultimately selling it.

Now I found scientific official proof: tongkat ali extract causes noticable muscle growthin men. The British Journal of Sports Medicine stated that in a double-blind placebo controlled scientific trial, the use of tongkat ali extract was the reason for a 5 % increase in lean body mass in the treatment group, while no noteworthy changes were seen in the placebo group. I believe that 5 % in 5 weeks is a big improvement, which becomes obvious if you calculate the increase this would mean over a course of a year (5 weeks – 5 %; 52 weeks – 50 %).

Among facts I found most interesting is that the journal article reports: “The mean arm circumference of the treatment group increased significantly by 1.8 cm after the supplementation, from 30.87 (1.88) to 32.67 (1.96) cm (p = 0.011), but there was no significant increase in the placebo group.”

You can read the abstract of the clinical trial with healthy men at the website of the British Journal of Sports Medicine:

http://bjsm.bmj.com/content/37/5/464

As you may expect from a scientific publication, the website of the British Journal of Sports Medicine is not so easy to navigate. In this specific case, the abstract on the scientific trial about tongkat ali has been put together with a number of other abstracts. The abstracts are numbered 001, 002, 003, and so on. The abstract that talks about tongkat ali’s effect on bodybuilding has the number 007. You have to be aware that the Latin, scientific name of tongkat ali is Eurycoma longifolia.

There are a few things you may want to pay attention to in an interpretation of the results of the cited scientific study with human subjects. For example, you should consider that the tongkat ali extract used in the trial has been made in a university laboratory. I assume there may be a difference between authentic university lab-extracted tongkat ali and the commercial products you find on health store shelves. In my opinion, if the reason for your tongkat ali usage is muscle gain, you can ignore all products from US heath food chain shops, and you don't have to look at Amazon, or eBay. Tongkat ali is one of the most expensive herbals on the market because (1) it’s rare, and (2) it takes a incredibly time long to grow. Thus, what you get as cheapish stuff is never a powerful extract. Unfortunately, many of the products you have to pay more money for, will also cheat you. You have to look what company produced the product you are interested to buy.

The only two country in the world where you still find substantial resources of tongkat ali in the wild are Indonesia and Thailand. The tree once was common in Malaysia, but because the search for tongkat ali has turned into something like the one for truffles in France or Italy, tongkat ali has since been named a protected plant in Malaysia, and forest areas where it is still found have already been watched over by forest rangers for several years. (The Star, January 30, 2001)

While you can read on the internet that much of “Malaysian” tongkat ali sold in recent years was actually from Indonesia, it’s expected that the supply from Indonesia will also dry up in the coming years. The former Indonesian president Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono stated that the protection of the Indonesian forests was a prime priority of his government. But as I saw from numerous news reports, they burned down forests anyway on a large scale to make space for palm oil plantations. I think Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono must have been joking when he promised: “The government will take strong action on the perpetrators and will take them to court where they will receive the most severe punishment.”



Tongkat ali isn’t a fast-growing weed. My Thai friend who have started a plantation for tongkat ali told me that full size can’t be expected in less than 25 years. The effectiveness of mature tongkat ali is said to be far superior to that of young plants. Furthermore, tongkat ali is as hard to grow as orchids, my Thai friends explained. The soil needs to be sandy and has to be well drained. However, new water is needed several times a week. Tongkat ali also needs a semi-shaded environment. The plant’s natural habitat is limited to tropical jungle slopes (which naturally are drained after a downpour) and which are partly shaded by the rain forest canopy while leaving some sunlight to reach the plant because of the angle of the terrain.

Due to the fact that tongkat ali is so expensive, even in Malaysia where it originated, I have seen a worrisome trend that traders there now think it more economical to sell herbal fillers that are laced with Pfizer’s Blue, rather than authentic tongkat ali (which buyers request). (New Straits Times, April 10, 2004)

For those of you who take the so-called tongkat ali for its prosexual effects, the doupe may actually work (though the substitution can be life-threatening, and sildenafil analogues and even authentic sildenafil are on record to give you a higher risk for a stroke ). However, for those of you who look for genuine tongkat ali for the aim of improving the ratio between lean body mass and fat, the stretched Pfizer’s Blue will have no effect.

As I have explained numerous times, the active ingredients in tongkat ali are present only in little amounts. You will need about 50 gram of the root for one dosage, and athletes among you who want to get maximum results without having to take illegal steroids will typically take 2 or 3 dosages a day. Scientifically established effectiveness, dropping resources, and the natural difficulty of analyzing the composition of a natural medication are a dangerous mix. While you may soon see authentic tongkat ali extract measured on gold scales, the demand of a growing market for ever cheaper products will definitely attract a huge number of cheaters.

How to guard yourself from being cheated? I suggest you always cheack the origin of a product before you buy. Are they an established seller in the tongkat ali market? Where are they located? You should avoid Singapore.

And simply, you shouldn't trust cheap prices when your seller can't explain to you why his prices are cheap.




Tongkatali.org's Impotence or erectile dysfunction


By Serge Kreutz


Impotence is now medically referred to as erectile dysfunction. But impotence is more than just erectile dysfunction. It is lost maleness.

Impotence is a condition much more complicated than most diseases. Many diseases are single-cause conditions.

A specific virus causes the flu or hepatitis, and specific bacteria cause tuberculosis. Many other conditions are, by and large, single-symptom diseases. A broken bone, a cataract of the eye, or the shingles are easy to diagnose. There are clear symptoms that usually apply to just that health problem. Erectile dysfunction cannot be defined like this.

While “erectile dysfunction” has become the term of choice among doctors and educated patients, it’s probably less accurate a description of what’s wrong than the old word “impotence”. “Erectile dysfunction” is a technical term, and it sounds much less embarrassing than “impotence”.

But the general idea of lost maleness carried by the word “impotence” actually describes more precisely the implication of the condition discussed here. Impotence is more than just erectile dysfunction… it may or may not be a blood-vessel insufficiency. But it may also be a loss of desire regulated by a certain neurotransmitter balance. It may have hormonal or psychological causes, or it may be a problem of sympathetic and parasympathetic nerve impulses. Erectile dysfunction, a lack of erection, is just a part of the condition impotence. Assuring an appropriate blood pressure in the male relationships organ does not solve the problem. That’s why erection injections and erection pumps (see youtube here) are not satisfactory by themselves. An erection without desire is a waste of effort (and money), and desire without the capability of a definite orgasm results in frustration rather than satisfaction.

Sumatra Pasak Bumi's tongkat ali nutmeg formula is a definite aphrodisiac


By Serge Kreutz

Sumatra Pasak Bumi sells formulas of tongkat ali / nutmeg and butea superba / nutmeg.

As of this time, these formulas are available only as capsules. We have opted for this limitation because nutmeg can clearly be overdosed, and while such overdoses are usually not life-threatening, they can be very uncomfortable indeed.

That said, nutmeg in civilized quantities of less than 1 gram per day, especially when used in a herbal stack with tongkat ali, butea superba, mucuna pruriens, and krachai dam, has clear aphrodisiac qualities.



Nutmeg is mildly euphoric, which results from the chemical similarity of some of its ingredients with the street drug ecstasy.

Nutmeg, in civilized quantities of less than 1 gram, also feels a bit like speed or meth in that it gives users a sense of "let's get it on".

However, increasing dosages of nutmeg to 5 or 10 grams (a definite overdose), won't produce a kick like ecstasy or meth because uncomfortable components will take over: nausea, dizziness, even hallucinations.



Because of these usually negative effects, authorities do not classify nutmeg as a drug with much abuse potential. Luckily so.

Nutmeg in civilized dosages also has some similarities to yohimbe, the herbal, or yohimbine, the pharmaceutical. Nutmeg in civilized dosages is agitating in a manner that resembles yohimbe, and in moments of excitement it can send warm shivers up and down the spinal cord that can be produced by yohimbe.

These shivers are similar to orgasmic sensations, but they occur in an excitement buildup phase more than during orgasm which is a sudden excitement drop. With yohimbe, the intensity of the orgasmic drop becomes impeded. Nutmeg in civilized dosages will not lower the intensity of the orgasmic drop, particularly when comsumed together with tongkat ali.



Nutmeg is a classic case for why relationships enhancement herbals MUST be stacked for optimal effect.

Large doses of single relationships enhancement herbals will cause unwanted side-effects in many users, and they will do so in an unpredictable pattern.

Worst for side effects of large dosages is nutmeg. Next in line for side effects of overdoses would be mucuna pruriens. Yohimbe also has miserable side effects in many users.



For yohimbe, these side effects are less dose dependent than for nutmeg and mucuna pruriens.

If nutmeg is added to a relationships enhancement stack based on tongkat ali, there usually are only positive aphrodisiac effects. But with yohimbe, unpleasant side effects like sleep disturbances set in at any quantity, however minimal.



Nutmeg is a classic case of why relationships enhancement herbals MUST be stacked. Because, for a stronger nutmeg effect, you should not consume more nutmeg. Instead, you support and enhance the nutmeg effect with tongkat ali, butea superba, krachai dam, fingerroot, tumeric, and small dosages of mucuna pruriens.

The broader your stack, the more likely you are to reap only benefits from nutmeg, tongkat ali, butea superba, tumeric, krachai dam, fenugreek, and ton krachai (boesenbergia rotunda).

Nutmeg is slightly different from the other items in the list because benefitial dosages are about ten times smaller for nutmeg than they are for tongkat ali, butea superba, krachai dam, fingerroot, fenugreek, tumeric, and mucuna pruriens extracts.

Because tolerable dosage of other herbals are measured in grams, up to 10 grams, and because for nutmeg they are measured in hundreds of milligrams, the nutmeg capsules we manufacture and distribute are 10 percent nutmeg, and 90 percent tongkat ali, butea superba, krachai dam, or fenugreek.








Read about marijuana and tongkat ali extract for meaningful relationships

or

Read a tell-it-all about Indonesian 1:200 extract (and a psychopath on the prowl for killings)


References:

Abernethy, M. K., Becker, L. B. (1992) Acute nutmeg intoxication. The American Journal of Emergency Medicine Volume 10, Issue 5, Pages 429-430 Tongkatali.org Bibliography

Bhuiyan, M. Alam, S. (2019) Pharmacological and biochemical investigations of methanolic extract of Myristica fragrans seeds repository.library.du.ac.bd

Bukvicki, D., Gottardi, D., Prasad, S., Novakovic, M., Marin, P., Tyagi, A.K., (2018) The healing effects of spices in chronic diseases. Current Medicinal Chemistry Tongkatali.org Bibliography

Brenner, N., Frank, O. S., Knight, E. (1993) Chronic nutmeg psychosis. Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine Volume 86 Issue 3 Pages: 179–180 Retrieved from: Tongkatali.org Bibliography

Chauhan, N.G., Sharma, V., Dixit, V. K., Thakur1, M. (2014) A Review on Plants Used for Improvement of Relationships Performance and Virility. BioMed Research International Volume 2014, Tongkatali.org Bibliography

Conley, J. (2002) Nutmeg only a spice. Proceedings of the 11th Annual History of Medicine Days Retrieved from: Tongkatali.org Bibliography

Dhaslin, Felita, Y., Issac, R., Prabha, Lakshmi, M. (2019) Antioxidant, antimicrobial, and health benefits of nutmeg. Drug Invention Today Volume 12 Issue 1, Pages: 67-169. Retrieved from: https://web.b.ebscohost.com/abstract?direct=true&profile=ehost&scope=site&authtype=crawler&jrnl
=09757619&AN=134240970&h=l%2bJJGSBWk4L%2bdC68SNTQuI
QN3KzZVq56WRZYYf8Z%2bjNMxni1W%2fhYZx%2fJMiTpJAFltY%2fjtAzc7MXSFA2rrpenMg%3d%3d&crl=c&resultNs=AdminWebAuth&resultLocal=
ErrCrlNotAuth&crlhashurl=login.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26profile%3dehost%26scope%3
dsite%26authtype%3dcrawler%26
jrnl%3d09757619%26AN%3d134240970

Ehrenpreis, J. E., DesLauriers, C., Lank, P., Armstrong, P. K., Leikin, J. B. (2014) Nutmeg Poisonings: A Retrospective Review of 10 Years Experience from the Illinois Poison Center, 2001–2011. Journal of Medical Toxicology Volume 10, Issue 2, Pages: 148–151 https://doi.org/10.1007/s13181-013-0379-7

Eng-Chong, T., Yean-Kee, L., Chin-Fei,C., Choon-Han, H., Sher-Ming, W., Thio Li-Ping, C., Gen-Teck, F., Khalid, N., Abd Rahman, N., Karsani, S.A., Othman, S., Othman, R., Yusof, R., (2012) Boesenbergia rotunda: From Ethnomedicine to Drug Discovery. Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine Volume 2012, Article ID 473637, 25 pages Tongkatali.org Bibliography

Gawin, F. H. (2012) Drugs and Eros: Reflections on Aphrodisiacs. Journal of Psychedelic Drugs Volume 10, Issue 3 Tongkatali.org Bibliography

Green, R. C. (1959) Nutmeg poisoning. JAMA Volume 171 Issue 10 Pages:1342-1344 Tongkatali.org Bibliography

Joseph, J. (1980) The nutmeg: its botany, agronomy, production, composition, and uses. Journal of Plantation Crops Volume 8 No. 2 Pages: 61-72 Retrieved from: Tongkatali.org Bibliography

Kotta, S., Ansari, S. H., Ali, J. (2013) Exploring scientifically proven herbal aphrodisiacs Pharmacognosy Reviews Volume 7 Issue 13 Pages: 1–10 Tongkatali.org Bibliography

Li Ching, A. Y., Wah, T. S., Sukari, M. A., Cheng Lian, G. E., Rahmani, M., Khalid, K. (2007) Characterization of flavonoid derivatives from Boesenbergia rotunda (L.) The Malaysian Journal of Analytical Sciences, Volume 11, No 1 Pages: 154-159

Ongwisespaiboon O, Jiraungkoorskul W. (2017) Fingerroot, Boesenbergia rotunda and its Aphrodisiac Activity. Pharmacognosy Reviews Volume 1 Issue 21 Pages:27-30 Tongkatali.org Bibliography

Roeters van Lennep, J.E., Schuit, S.C., van Bruchem-Visser, R.L., Özcan, B. (2015) Unintentional nutmeg autointoxication. The Netherlands Journal of Medicine Volume 73 Issue 1 Pages:46-8 Retrieved from: Tongkatali.org Bibliography

Sangalli, B.C., Sangalli, B., Chiang, W. (2000) Toxicology of Nutmeg Abuse. Journal of Toxicology: Clinical Toxicology Volume 38, Issue 6 https://doi.org/10.1081/CLT-100102020

Scholefield, J. H. (1986) Nutmeg--an unusual overdose. Emergency Medicine Journal Volume 3 Issue 2 Pages: 154 https://dx.doi.org/10.1136%2Femj.3.2.154

Shamlou, R. (2010) Natural Aphrodisiacs. The Journal of Relationships Medicine Volume 7, Issue 1, Part 1, Pages 39-49 Tongkatali.org Bibliography

Singh, R., Vikas Gupta, V., Bansal, P., Singh, R., Kumar, D. (2010) Pharmacological potential of plant used as aphrodisiacs. International Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences Review and Research Retrieved from: Tongkatali.org Bibliography

Sumalatha, K. Kumar, S, Lakshmi, S. M. (2010) Review on natural aphrodisiac potentials to treat dysfunction. International Journal of Pharmacy & Therapeutics Volume 1 Issue 1 Pages: 6-14 Retrieved from: Tongkatali.org Bibliography

Tajuddin, Ahmad, S., Latif, A., Qasmi, I. A. (2003) Aphrodisiac activity of 50% ethanolic extracts of Myristica fragrans Houtt. (nutmeg) and Syzygium aromaticum (L) Merr. & Perry. (clove) in male mice: a comparative study. BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine Tongkatali.org Bibliography

Tajuddin, Ahmad, S., Latif, A., Qasmi, I. A., Amin, K. M. Y. (2005) An experimental study of relationships function improving effect of Myristica fragrans Houtt. (nutmeg) BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine Tongkatali.org Bibliography

Temkitthawon, P., Viyoch, J., Limpeanchob, N., Pongamornkul, W., Sirikul, W., Kumpila, A., Suwanborirux, K., Ingkaninana, K., (2008) Screening for phosphodiesterase inhibitory activity of Thai medicinal plants. Journal of EthnopharmacologyVolume 119, Issue 2, Pages 214-217 Tongkatali.org Bibliography

Truitt, E. B., Duritz, G., Ebersberger, E. M. (1962) Evidence of Monoamine Oxidase Inhibition by Myristicin and Nutmeg. Experimental Biology and Medicine Volume 112, Issue 3 Tongkatali.org Bibliography

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PT Sumatra Pasak Bumi
7th floor, Forum Nine
Jl. Imam Bonjol No.9
Petisah Tengah
Medan Petisah
Medan City
North Sumatra 20236
Indonesia
Tel: +62-813 800 800 20


Disclaimer: Statements on this page have not undergone the FDA approval process.


Privacy policy of Sumatra Pasak Bumi

For us at Sumatra Pasak Bumi, privacy in the age of the Internet is a major concern, and we greatly welcome the European General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).

We have always been dedicated to privacy protection. The snooping and spooking of all and everybody is a pest. It’s not just the NSA and every large search engine and browser (we recommend Duckduckgo for searches and as browser), but even minor businesses that do their databases and customer profiling in hope of McDonald's style do-you-want-fries-with-that cross sales.

We don’t.

We respect the privacy of customers and people visiting our website. Our site is run from a secure socket layer. We do not use cookies. We do not maintain customer accounts for logging in later. Our website is simple html programming, and we don't even use WordPress templates or e-commerce plug-ins. We don't do a newsletter to which customers could subscribe, and we don't even include standard social media buttons that would link visitors of our site to certain Facebook or Twitter profiles.

We prefer communication by email using a gmail account because this is probably still the most private mode of communication (Hillary may disagree), and when we have information to disseminate to the public, we just publish it on our website. We do offer the option to communicate with us by chat apps if a site visitor so wishes, but prefer email.

If privacy is your concern, you are in good hands with us.